Scottie Pippen’s torture chamber

With Scottie’s intro into the Hall of Fame imminent, there has been a renewed interest in his career…which, oddly enough, was never fully appreciated due to Michael Jordan’s shadow. And as shadows go, Jordan’s was sometimes like a black hole.

At any rate, although Pippen provided some potent offense, we all know his surest skill was his defense. A few months ago, I described being defended by Pippen as being caught in his torture chamber. Well, watch this video and welcome to his chamber.

From Docksquad Sports (via TrueHoop):

18 Responses to Scottie Pippen’s torture chamber

  1. mikemayer3@hotmail.com'
    thirdsaint August 12, 2010 at 1:37 pm #

    Loved watching that, thanks for posting it. Scottie was amazing and it’s the Bulls defense in ’96 that really helped them win 72 games. That’s why I think Jeff Van Gundy is all hot air when saying the Heat could win 73. No one on that team can defend like the Bulls could.

  2. JCrawKnicks11@gmail.com'
    PJ August 12, 2010 at 1:47 pm #

    Can’t help but notice in the first part of that clip how physical the game was. How much of that contact would have been called a foul today? Coincidentally, that’s the main argument I use as to why the players of today can’t be compared to the players of the 80s or 90s.

    Also, you’ve gotta love Barkley’s expression after that failed over the top.

  3. doubleaccord@gmail.com'
    Tony C. August 12, 2010 at 2:14 pm #

    Brilliant defender – no question about it. And having watched a replay of an old Bulls–Jazz playoff game on NBA TV the other night, I was reminded of how incredibly strong and smart Rodman was on defense. His ability to successfully stop much bigger players – Malone in this case – was remarkable.

    Pippen, Rodman and Jordan: has there ever been another team with three starting defenders of that caliber?

  4. bobbysimmons August 12, 2010 at 3:35 pm #

    agree with PJ, no doubt pip was great, but for the first minute of the clip when pippen defended with his chest and forearm, those would be called fouls every time today. not to mention the all those b/s charge calls, refs have gotten much better and differentiating blocking fouls and charges these days.

  5. contrerasadvocates@yahoo.com'
    Savage August 12, 2010 at 5:09 pm #

    I agree with AJ that today’s NBA has gotten soft. And in turn produced soft pre-modana stars like Bosh and we know the others. However, Pippen had an uncanny ability to position himself in front of the dribblers. He was so quick to get to where the offensive player wanted to go that they had almost no options. Man I loved watching Pippen play it taught me a lot about the game!

  6. mikemayer3@hotmail.com'
    thirdsaint August 12, 2010 at 5:13 pm #

    The refs might’ve gotten better at calling charges and blocks but they’ve been horrible in other ways. There’s no reason there should be as many fouls called as there are and the numbers are astounding. The ’06 Finals were Exhibit A as to why the league is too soft now and last year’s finals were Exhibit B.

  7. bullsbythehorns@gmail.com'
    Matt McHale August 12, 2010 at 5:19 pm #

    “Loved watching that, thanks for posting it. Scottie was amazing and it’s the Bulls defense in ‘96 that really helped them win 72 games. That’s why I think Jeff Van Gundy is all hot air when saying the Heat could win 73. No one on that team can defend like the Bulls could.”

    JVG also seems to be forgetting that the 72-win season happened immediately after expansion (the Grizzlies and Raptors were added to the league). For the record, the 1971-72 Lakers, whose record of 69 wins held up until ’96, also set their record after expansion.

    “Can’t help but notice in the first part of that clip how physical the game was. How much of that contact would have been called a foul today? Coincidentally, that’s the main argument I use as to why the players of today can’t be compared to the players of the 80s or 90s.”

    That’s a fair point. Pippen — like all other great defenders of his era — were allowed to make an awful lot of contact with their opponents. Still, the fundamentals and physical skills were there, and I’m pretty sure Pippen would be one of the top defenders in today’s game too.

    “Also, you’ve gotta love Barkley’s expression after that failed over the top.”

    Sir Charles always did have the best expressions, followed closely by Kevin McHale.

    “Brilliant defender – no question about it. And having watched a replay of an old Bulls–Jazz playoff game on NBA TV the other night, I was reminded of how incredibly strong and smart Rodman was on defense. His ability to successfully stop much bigger players – Malone in this case – was remarkable.”

    You know, everybody always talks about how Malone “failed” to win a title in his two trips to the Finals, but the Mailman had to deal with a defender well-suited to make his life difficult. Meanwhile, Jordan was defended by Jeff Horncek (who was limping around on one leg) and Bryon Russell (never a stopper). And when you consider how physical Rodman was allowed to be, it’s not hard to figure out why Malone’s stats were down in those two Finals.

    “Pippen, Rodman and Jordan: has there ever been another team with three starting defenders of that caliber?”

    I busted my brain on this one and came up with nothing.

    “agree with PJ, no doubt pip was great, but for the first minute of the clip when pippen defended with his chest and forearm, those would be called fouls every time today.”

    Not necessarily ever time, but much more frequently, yes.

  8. davidpaulroosa@yahoo.com'
    AK Dave August 12, 2010 at 7:38 pm #

    “Pippen, Rodman and Jordan: has there ever been another team with three starting defenders of that caliber?”

    Wallace-Prince-Wallace is worthy of consideration.

    Duncan-Robinson-Jackson is as well.

    How about Isaiah-Dumars-Rodman?

    Also, don’t forget Ron Harper was no slouch on Defense either

  9. mikemayer3@hotmail.com'
    thirdsaint August 12, 2010 at 9:05 pm #

    Considering the expansion the Grizzlies sure gave the Bulls that memorable tough matchup that Jordan willed them to victory in. Something I also doubt the Heat have the killer instinct to do.

  10. JCrawKnicks11@gmail.com'
    PJ August 12, 2010 at 9:41 pm #

    When I said that many of those plays would have been called fouls, I didn’t mean to diminish Pip’s defense in any way. Really, I use it as a knock on current superstars because it makes both Pippen and Jordan’s OFFensive achievements that much more remarkable due to the other tricks defenders could use to stop them.

    I once heard that Jordan used to have his trainers hit him with 60-lb bags while trying to finish at the rim to simulate games. Meanwhile, Wade needed a wheelchair to get him off the court after a shoulder injury…since obviously shoulders are needed for walking. Can you imagine how he would’ve held up to the Bad Boys?

  11. Raevyrn August 13, 2010 at 12:02 am #

    The other thing that seems to stick out in my mind from watching those games is how much Pippen and Jordan wanted to win. When your top two guys are pulling like that it just elevates the rest of the team’s effort. It’s also astounding how well Pippen could tip the ball to himself, so much control.

    I’m also reminded of a comment by Phil Jackson regarding the difference between Kobe and MJ: hand size. The ability to palm the ball with one hand really opens up a lot of moves. You can see Pippen do just this, displaying the full arsenal throughout the highlights, whether it’s down low in the post or in the air doing the fakes on the transition layups. He really was one of the most complete players in terms of skill sets.

    Looking back I sure do feel privileged to have seen such skill all on one team. Thanks for the memories Pip.

  12. loslobosworld@yahoo.com'
    LOBOS August 13, 2010 at 12:58 am #

    One of the best compilation of highlights I have ever seen, steals, blocks, foot work, hustle plays, assist, 3 point shots, dunks and hundreds of other highlights that were not included.

    As far as the NBA, that was the golden era. If you were lucky enough to be part of that generation, consider yourself blessed cause we got to experience the game in it’s truest form. Competitive, physical, superstars all over the league and some of the greatest rivalry/battles in sports history.

    P.S. Pippen is one of if not the most under appreciated sports figures ever.

  13. zilla2033@yahoo.com'
    zillaa August 13, 2010 at 2:15 am #

    “Meanwhile, Wade needed a wheelchair to get him off the court after a shoulder injury…since obviously shoulders are needed for walking. Can you imagine how he would’ve held up to the Bad Boys?”

    Exactly, PJ, exactly.

    Say what you will about the refs getting ‘better’ at differentiating blocks and charges, I’m pretty sure the NBA rule book doesn’t say you have to be standing in with your arms straight up to take a charge. I believe it says you need to establish defensive position with your feet before the offensive player leaves his feet, and that’s what Pippen did time and time again. If we didn’t have Derrick Rose ready to get today’s superstar treatment any time now, I wouldn’t give a crap about the National Basketball Entertainment Association.

  14. Anonymous August 13, 2010 at 4:08 am #

    Imagine if the NBA allowed more contact in 2011. The chummy players would soon be at each other like they were in the 80’s. They HATED each other. No more “super friends” and high fives.

  15. inkybreath@gmail.com'
    inkybreath August 13, 2010 at 4:43 am #

    Just found this, in case you haven’t seen it… A short little musical view of Derrick Rose in high school …

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H1Lr58Wkz-0&feature=channel

  16. inkybreath@gmail.com'
    inkybreath August 13, 2010 at 4:46 am #

    Ok and this is just beautiful …

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0BnSaJhh-Fs&feature=channel

  17. yomomma@hotmail.com'
    Scottie Pimpin August 13, 2010 at 8:28 am #

    i appreciate this upload, scottie was a joy to watch on both ends.

  18. mikemayer3@hotmail.com'
    thirdsaint August 13, 2010 at 1:34 pm #

    That’s actually an interesting point I hadn’t thought about. Maybe the refs and the league trying to call more fouls and minimize the physical play has led to everyone being friends and not hating each other. And maybe, in a small way, that has led to Lebron’s antics of wanting to join his buddies instead of compete against them. It’s sad and I wish someone would smack Stern and let him know this isn’t for the best.

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